New duty in reform bill

The Scottish government intends to create a Procurement Reform Bill which would establish a national legislative framework for buying goods, works, and services including construction projects, worth some £9,000 million a year.

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Contractors quit public sector

Almost two-thirds of Scottish contractors have abandoned bidding for public sector projects over the past three years because the costs of procurement are to high, says a report from the Scottish Building Federation (SBF).

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News in Brief: October 2012

The All Party Parliamentary Group for Excellence in the Built Environment has called for a public sector ‘procurement revolution’ in a report ‘A better deal for public building’.

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Time gets a 21st Century approach

Guest editor Charlotte Heywood of Olswang, who assisted the drafters of the new CIOB Complex Projects Contract, explains the thinking behind it. It is a radical attempt to manage time, delay and its cost consequences, she argues.

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Reports from the courts: August 2012

Our latest round up of the court decisions of most relevance to construction comes from Will Buckby and Andrew Beale of Clyde and Company, focussing on a TCC decision relating to set-off against an adjudicator’s decision; and a case that highlights the dangers of using letters of intent.

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Care needed with termination

Our contracts monitor Michael Phipps, Principal of Thurston Consultants, continues his scrutiny of the JCT Intermediate Building Contract with Contractor’s Design, turning his attention to the clauses dealing with termination of Named Sub-Contractors. Main contractors need to be careful to follow the exact procedures, he warns.

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How secure is your security?

Contractor insolvency is on the rise again as the industry struggles against weak workloads and falling margins. Jane Miles of SNR Denton provides a timely review of the methods of protecting against these events.

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UK Bribery Act – one year on

The first anniversary of the Bribery Act fell on 1 July. Val Surgenor of MacRoberts says although there have been no major prosecutions so far, more effective enforcement can be expected.

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Avoiding unintentional pitfalls

Disputes over letters of intent are as common as ever but, argue Will Buckby and Andrew Croft of Beale and Company, they can easily be avoided, or at least used with greater care.

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